Friday, January 12, 2018

Book Review #55: Undelivered Letters

Name: Undelivered Letters
Author: J. Alchem
No. of Pages: 70
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: AdProm Media
Price: Rs. 49/- (Kindle Edition)
Published in: 2017

How did I get it? Promotion agent.

THE BLURB SAYS:
Aron, a postman with Marioson Postal Service, found an abandoned bag. It had a few letters that were supposed to be delivered - 20 years ago. He had a choice, either to deliver them now or abandon them forever. He chooses the former.

What were these letters all about? Who wrote them? Who are the recipients? Do these letters still carry a value, after 20 years?


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
J. Alchem is a voracious reader and a critically acclaimed author. He is the winner of StoryMirror- 2015 (a nationwide writing competition), NaNoWriMo-2015 and 2016, and superhero storyteller (2014).

He has written in several magazines and newspapers and received the appreciation for the same. His stories have been published in numerous Anthologies such as Blank Space, Love Bytes and Mighty Thoughts.

He is actively involved in writing quotes and short write-ups which are often seen being circulated among the youth in Facebook, Whatsapp, and other Social networking sites.

Recently he has signed a contract for a short movie on one of his award-winning short stories.

MY THOUGHTS:
Aron, the protagonist, worked as a postman in the beginning of his career. Then he gets promoted and then he forgets to deliver his last bunch of letters, a total of nine letters. And he notices them after two decades. Honestly, the reasons behind not delivering the letters is beyond believable. And if that can really happen, that's sheer negligence of duty!

The author narrates the stories behind three letters. I felt that the characters and their plots weren't thought out properly and they lacked depth. The concept of the book had great potential but not it didn't mature well.

It is quite a simple book and quite short too. So it makes a reasonably quick read.

I give "Undelivered Letters" 2 stars on a scale of 5.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Book Review #54: The Other Guy

Name: The Other Guy
Author: Aakash Mehrotra
No. of Pages: 200
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Jufic Books (An imprint of Leadstart Publishing)
Price: Rs. 249/-
Published in: 2017

How did I get it? From the publisher.

THE BLURB SAYS:
Set in contemporary India, The Other Guy is a tale of forbidden love. Amidst laws which declare them criminals,emotional repression and societal suppression, Nikhil and Anuj are two talented young men, deeply in love with each other. Though polar opposites,they effortlessly complement each other.Anuj had lived a constricted life, always in his fear of the consequences of the truth; Nikhil, a carefree soul, is ready to take on the world. The truth is known only to a few select friends, and to Anuj's sister.
 
The novel is about making the hard, heartbreaking choices to allow such a relationship to breathe and survive in a traditional land of rigid taboos. Anuj experiences separation from his family as he surrenders to the questions in their eyes and decides to choose candour over coy; to listen to his desires; to be open and free about it. But it is not the same with his partner, Nikhil. When his mother initiates talk of his marriage, Anuj coaxes Nikhil to take a decision that can scar their lives forever.
 
Do societal diktats run the lives of these gifted young men or does love prevail? Do Anuj and Nikhil have the last laugh, using society against itself, so they can breathe and live as they wish?
 
Nikhil and Anuj's story is just one of many, most of them buried in the misery of silence. It deserves to be read by everyone who wishes to see a more inclusive world where acceptance and humanity grace our lives.
 
A bold and beautiful book that touches the heart and mind forever.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


MY THOUGHTS:
It is a love story. The only difference from a regular love story is that the lovers are of the same gender. Freshman year, guy meets guy. Courtship follows and they start dating. Secret passionate encounters. True friends, defiant family and rebellious lovers. Some blissful moments and then finally reality strikes.

The protagonists, Anuj and Nikhil, can be anyone. They are in love and dream of spending their lives together. But it is not meant to be. They can never live their true lives out in the open. They have their own hopes and aspirations of having their own family. But they are forced to lead dual lives. Despite all odds, with true friends and sometimes the support of their family, they might just manage to have the last laugh.

The author has touched upon a sensitive issue. LGBT rights and the reality of their situation in a country like ours. The story itself is well-written and has all the elements of a good fast-paced romantic novel

I give "The Other Guy" 3.5 stars on a scale of 5.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Book Review #53: The Goat Thief

Name: The Goat Thief
Author: Perumal Murugan (Translated by N. Kalyan Raman)
No. of Pages: 240
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Juggernaut Books 
Price: Rs. 399/-
Published in: 2017

How did I get it? From the publisher.

THE BLURB SAYS: 

 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 


MY THOUGHTS:
Perumal Murugan's stories are altogether of a different league. His style is absolutely unconventional and extremely imaginative. The translator, Mr. N. Kalyan Raman has also done an amazing job.

"The Goat Thief" is a collection of 10 short stories. The plots are ordinary, but the perspective from which they are written is extraordinary. Smallest of details are taken care of in the narrative.

Ordinary events like taking a swim and playing games in a well, having an antique chair at home, a young child crying for her plaything, a leaking toilet pipe, a young boy coming to stay at his granny's place and a goat thief unable to carry out his theft are turned into beautiful stories.

I really enjoyed "The Well","Musical Chairs", "The Nights the Owls Stopped Crying", ""Mirror of Innocence" and "The Goat Thief". In several of the stories I wanted to know what happens next.

I definitely want to read more of the author's work now.

I give "The Goat Thief" 4 stars on a scale of 5.